Posted by: kerrywills | March 25, 2011

Focus on value


Having spent most of my career in a consultative role, I was brought up with the sense of demonstrating value. When you get billed out for $300 an hour it is important to make your clients feel like they are getting their money’s worth. I really believe that every professional should have this mindset at work.

It amazes me the number of people in the corporate world in functions that could be considered overhead or administrative, who get paid a lot of money and who don’t necessarily provide significant value for that money.  Then to top it off, they have a sense of entitlement and have big expectations for bonuses and rewards.

I believe that everyone needs to reflect on their contributions to the organization and look at ways of maximizing their impact. Here are some examples…

  • Look for opportunities to streamline or eliminate processes versus adding new ones
  • Look for ways to decrease complexity in the solutions we provide people
  • Focus on work that drives results and commitments
  • Grow other employees to improve their contributions

I bet if we all acted as if the salaries of our co-workers came from our own pockets then we might make some different decisions and have higher expectations of productivity and value from them. In this market, no one can be complacent about the value they provide. Hopefully this post added some value to you today.

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Responses

  1. From what I observe, it seems to me that value is not rewarded in the corporate world. Promotions and bonuses appear to be driven by irrelevant criteria such as team size, not value. For example, managing 15 employees is likely to result in a promotion, however, radically improving efficiency and effectiveness that allows you to deliver the same result with less cost and two employees will result in a career limiting move.

    As long as “deliver bottom line value” is not the top criterion on performance appraisals, people will continue to add bloat to processes that have no logical reason to exist at all.


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